All Rise!

Updated: Oct 6

Baseball’s first ever slugger, Babe Ruth, set the record for the most home runs in a major league season when he hit 54 dingers as the right fielder for the New York Yankees during the 1920 season.


That record lasting only one season because during the 1921 baseball season the Sultan of Swat hit 59 home runs. Ruth again breaking his own record for a second time.


In 1927 Ruth would break his single-season home run record for the fourth and final time when the hot dog and beer guzzling Bambino hit 60 round-trippers batting third in the Yankees Murderer’s Row.


Considered among baseball’s most hallowed records, second in stature only to the career home run record. Ruth’s mark of 60 home runs in a season would stand for 34-years until another Yankee right fielder Roger Maris, would hit 61 home runs during the 1961 season.


Though despite hitting one more home run than the Babe, Maris' record brought controversy. Baseball commissioner Ford Frick, a friend of Babe Ruth's called for a “distinctive mark” to be added next to Maris’ home run total in baseball record books claiming Maris was given an unfair advantage.


That season, Major League Baseball had expanded their schedule to 162-games from 154, giving Roger Maris eight additional games to pass the Babe’s record.


And Maris needed them all! The Yankee right fielder did not hit his 61st home run until the 162nd and final game of the season.


Commissioner Frick’s efforts to protect the Babe forever adding THE asterisk to baseball’s lexicon.


Asterisk or otherwise, Maris' accomplishment earned the Yankee right fielder baseball immortality, and the league's Most Valuable Player award.


THE Steroid Era


Since Maris, a Major League Baseball player has hit 61 or more home runs in a single season six times. @MLB currently recognizes Barry Bonds as the single season home run leader, after the Giant outfielder raged his way to 73 home runs during the 2001 season.


But Bonds, with Mark McGuire and Sammy Sosa the only three baseball players to hit more than 60 home runs in a season–sans Ruth and Maris, was known to have used steroids during the most productive years of his career.


Including, during the record-setting* 2001 season! Leaving baseball fans to choose for themselves who is the real home run champ.


You Be THE Judge


Last week another Yankee outfielder, Aaron Judge, hit his 61st home run of the season. In the eyes of many fans, the hit ties Judge with Roger Maris as the Knights Templar of the one-true single-season home run record.


With three games still to play this season, Fate will have her say on whether Aaron Judge hits his 62nd home run to break the tie with Roger Maris. But whether he passes Maris or the pair of remain forever tied, Judge will be the American League Most Valuable Player this season, as was Maris in 1961.


Despite my friend Matt Bai’s uncertainty!


Judge’s only competition for the MVP award will come from Anaheim Angels pitcher and designated hitter Shohei Ohtani. The remarkable “two-way” Ohtani among the league leaders in wins with 15 this season; while also hitting 34-home runs.


The last baseball player to pitch and hit so prodigiously during a single season was Babe Ruth.


But despite his two-way talents, Ohtani's production has meant little to an Angel's team likely to finish 30-games out of first place. Meaning Ohtani's freak-skills will not be enough to attract many MVP votes away from baseball's newly crowned home run king.


THE Retailers Lament


I heard from a dealer, who after noticing a number of “odd” inventory adjustments, asked if his stores had a problem with employee theft?


“YES!” I thought, before he shared the details.


Since I don’t know many career retailers who have not had a brush (or worse!) with the plague of retail.


The call triggering memories of my own two experiences as a victim of employee theft during my years at Tremont Paint.


Well-practiced inventory protocols are a dealer’s best defense in reducing the chances of becoming a victim of employee theft. Or at-least limiting its impact when it happens!


Placing orders for goods using purchase orders and checking those products into your POS are good first steps to limit that exposure but if you want to avoid THE retailer’s lament, you’ll need to do more.


Inventory protocols which include cycle counts, year-end inventory planning, transactional and product audits, proper database management and a multi-layered oversight plan which doesn’t allow an employee to oversee their own work are all requirements if you’re going to keep control over your investment in inventory. And, protect yourself from employee theft.


Still Working From Home?


With my podcast last week, I discovered that despite #Sherwin-Williams’ ongoing problems selling paint, particularly to DIY, THE #hashtag still brings in the listeners! Including these four checking in from the company’s Cleveland, Ohio corporate headquarters.

Sherwin CEO #JohnMorikis still allowing the team to work remotely.